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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
at this and say, what civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not long ago i was up at a place called chimney rock in southwest colorado. and it's over 8,000 feet. and you are up at the southern end ftd rocky mountains and there is this scarp of rock that rises up probably about a thousand feet out of a valley floor and right at the tip of this scarp there are two twin towers of rock. if you get to a certain place on top of this very narrow butte, you can see between these twin towers and there happens to be a great house built between these two towers and every 18.6 years when the moon goes into its northernmost point on the horizon, it rises between those two towers. i was there at the beginning of the last 18.6 year cycle and we stood up there, probably 20 of us, researchers, forest service people, all gathered at the same spot with cameras and huddled -- it was late december at 8,0
everything they taught me as far as religion and jesus christ, but i was interbreeding and likes to read and started getting into history and discovered that a lot of real history could not reconcile with what was in the bible. the question is, i discovered a series of books that mention, suggest perhaps that there really was no jesus christ. the historical records actually start almost two centuries after this character appeared, and it could possibly be something that was -- i mean, an invention, but have you addressed the fact that for 200 years so before there was writing about this, nothing appears, no letters from anybody, no graffiti, no correspondence between ancient peoples about this cheeses character. have you ever looked into this? why is everybody always take for granted that there is a jesus character, let alone the fact that he was a god or some other got? >> guest: i appreciate, sir. i will tell you this. these -- are there some things that are in my room and some that are out? i will tell you, we will look at any theory sometimes that are out there, but whenever you want
discussion of the impact of very strongly developing fundamental movements in the world religions, particularly monotheistic religions, impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as perhaps creating a certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment of the impact of fundamentalist religious movements, particularly in the context of what is going to be a new normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> i think what is so interesting about this discussion is the baseline question, just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america and american power and leadership. how powerful did america look in 1979 up to vietnam? not very. how powerful did america look in 1989, 10 years later? extremely powerful. 1999, in vincible. 2009-now? well, we have settled down, but we do not really know what we have settled down into. i think it is a baseline question, and i think we forget how quickly the perception of the strings -- strength of american leadership can be. what i think is the question a
think that people have a right to not practice religion here. they have a right to do things the way they feel comfortable doing it, which is called secular or religious thinking. they have the right in this country not to follow religious law. for him to feel that he needed to resign over a scandal, i do not think that is proper when he does not have to follow religious thinking about sex in this country. host: thank you for the call this morning. here is the editorial from "usa today." host: diane, want to get your thoughts this morning on the democratic line. caller: i went to school with one of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we
'll really have to think a lot about, is that religious religion, or is it really deep and historical sense of oneness? my own little theory is that it became until recently, people like strom thurmond, the fact that so many white men, historically in this country pulled themselves that they were not the product of race and so this invisibility of the product of race is not the product of the women who must've really wanted them. otherwise it is -- it is very clear that some parts operate at a distance. >> i would also, speaking to your question about whether this is about action or reaction, and of course, i think it is all part of this so that everything is constant in action and reaction -- one thing i want to point to, i think when we talk about these kind of race comments on the contraceptive comments are so outrageous over the past year, we think of it as a republican blood of stupidity. in fact, one of the interesting things is that it was prompted by unusual behavior on the part of the democrats. the democrats, while being the party of women, and about the time -- as soon as they st
a weird thing as a muslim to have my religion used as a way to delegitimatize the president. you know? yeah, this play sort of deals with a lot of that stuff. it's a very brave, provocative piece of theater, and i was very excited about it. >> why did you take on this role, because it is so different than what you normally do? >> well, i'm an actor, so i have been doing dramatic stuff and comedic stuff my whole career. ever since i played that pixie in the school play. thank god people know about that now. >> roll the tape. where is that? >> there probably is somewhere. i've been doing both my whole career, so, know, the last six or seven years i have been on "the daily show" and people know me as that guy, that comedian guy, but for me to go do dramatic stuff is not that much of a stretch. i have been doing it a lot. >> when you saw how the election turned out and we have heard from mitt romney very recently saying that, look, he thought the reason obama won says was because he thought there were gifts he was giving out to african-americans, to latino, to young people. >> cars and th
see political risk to things like fracking coming down? do politicians get religion here? >> i think they already have. certainly if politicians haven't, voters have. we need to look at the results in new york state in some of the local state elections where anti-fracking candidates were defeated very resoundingly. in areas where natural gas and associated gas liquids and even oil can be extracted through the fracking process, more and more you're going to see residents, homeowners, property owners speaking their mind saying this is a resource we want to see exploited not only for ourselves but for the nation and for our own energy independence. >> if this report comes true, does that mean that nat gas prices are destined to remain historically low? >> yes and no. natural gas until we get a sufficient pipeline infrastructure built out to handle some of the swings that we see in certain pockets and i think particularly in the northeast, you know, you're still going to see temporary price spikes. your thesis is correct and your question is correct in that longer term we have sufficient
and really not about race or religion. and that is a difficult concept for some others as they look at our society, net and don't necessarily fully understand it. >> i'm a sponsor with northrop-grumman. i am curious because i lived in syria, to go back to syria, when there is a lot of discussion about things breaking down into sectarianism, i don't see any mention of the fact that syria has probably the largest christian population in the middle middle east, something like 20 to 30%. [inaudible] >> my figures are dated. anyway i am curious, if you would comment on the role of the christian community in syria and how you see that playing out? thank you. >> john -- jen'nan. >> we aren't hearing a lot about the difference between the muslims and christians because it's not an overarching and pressing problem in syria and getting back to comment earlier about the rest of the region, my half brother who was with the libyan rebels against gadhafi, they are now all trying to help the turks get assad out so getting back to marc's comment, we have gone a long way to at least getting some of the res
of health. their religion even disclose. it reminds me a lot of the diagram of the head with a million sperm around it. anyway, it's like the dolphins, to be honest. anyway, the other thing that you learn watching these games is a lot of parents can be idiots. and so what got us going on this idea of this book a mother and a text, you have a guy covering a little girls soccer game and then another guy who's a parent who objected to a call the referee had made. they get into an argument. the kids don't care, but the parents cared deeply. they don't ever want to see each other again. they don't like each other. they keep running into each other during the course of that afternoon fate conspires to bring them together over and over again. within about 12 hours of their first meeting they have a series of events that are perfectly plausible, accidentally hijacked a clothing optional cruise ship, as so often happens in youth soccer. not an entirely realistic plot. the way we rode it was allen would write a chapter in send it to me and i would write a chapter in quickly instead of working toward s
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)